Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Music Restoration Handbook is now available

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Music Restoration Handbook is now available

    Marc Hildebrant has written a Music Restoration Handbook based on the Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Software. It is titled, "Music Restoration Handbook - - - Early Disc Records to Today's LPs". Details about this nicely written and very informative book can be found here:

    http://www.diamondcut.com/st3/produc...tion-handbook/


    Craig
    "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

  • #2
    I am totally getting that next payday!

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe that you will find it to be quite useful as you are an audio restoration enthusiast.
      "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

      Comment


      • #4
        Just ordered it. Looking forward to seeing what Marc has written.
        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi John,

          We have received your order this morning. We will ship it out today and I think that you will enjoy Marc's work.

          Craig
          "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

          Comment


          • #6
            John,

            Order shipped today, 8-22-18.

            Craig
            "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

            Comment


            • #7
              Craig (and Marc) -

              Just got it in the mail today and looking forward to reading and learning more. I love the cover picture; I don't think I have ever put that big of speakers on my desk.

              My grandmother used to have a crank up Edison record player that my dad coveted; however, when she passed away, it went to my uncle, and then when he passed, I think it went to my cousin (but don't know). Don't think it would be as appreciated as much as my dad and I would.

              That being said, many years ago, my dad brought his 7" reel-to-reel tape recorder with him to my grandmothers house and with a microphone, recorded every one of those extremely heavy quarter inch disks (well it seemed that way). When he did this, we kids were told to go outside and play so there would be limited extraneous noise on the recording, although I'm sure when I listen to it, there will be some occasional background talking and noise. I know my dad still has those reels, but probably hasn't listened in years. Whenever it gets to the point that I inherit it (because I'm pretty sure my sister won't want it), I know what I'm going to be using Diamond Cut to do in my future retirement.

              John

              Comment


              • #8
                Those reel to reel tapes should be a lot of fun to restore when you get them. Our cylinders were all transferred to analog tape about 30 years ago by myself. I covered the inside of the Edison horn with cotton. Then,I took a high quality Beyer microphone and shoved it into the depths of the horn of the Edison player, but surrounded by cotton. Then, I filled the remaining space with more cotton to the extent that the horn and cotton completely hid the microphone. And, those are my transfers. They sound fine, although it would have been better had I modified the machine to accept a stereo phono cartridge and transfer that way. Nonetheless we enjoy the old cylinders and can listen to them all cleaned up and without worry of wearing out the records or machine.


                Craig
                Last edited by Craig Maier; 08-29-2018, 09:54 PM.
                "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

                Comment


                • #9
                  John,

                  I have an E-Mail address in the back for any comments you want to send me.

                  With regard to the big speakers...they help to hear any scratches and they were low in cost. They were a Radio Shack copy of Advent speakers.

                  I have some cylinder transfers that used a crystal element instead of the diaphram in an Edison Reproducer. The sound is quite nice for the two minute cylinder records.

                  Marc

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yep, digitizing the tapes will be a fun project in my retirement. I've been on vacation for two weeks (had a great time in a cabin in NC with family and friends with a brook that runs right behind it). Just now getting into reading the book.
                    John

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ​As a newbie to transcribing vinyl I've struggled to establish a process that would give me decent recordings but found myself jumping around with different techniques without acceptable/repeatable results. I intended to restore my LP/45's but started to rescue 78's I found at estate sales (most were in fair condition). I ordered Marc's Handbook (HB) in July and have read it twice cover-to-cover. The HB provides a very good framework to begin an orderly process for restoration work. It provides detailed procedures and filter settings to use for the 78 Electric and LP/45 I'm interested in but it also covers acoustical and diamond discs. I've practiced with Marc's recommended filing system and detailed methodology/filter settings and have already gotten better results.
                      My current set-up consists of a Garrard 82 TT w/Shure cart. set-up for 78's and an ELAC/Realistic 45 TT w/Realistic R700E cart. set-up for LP/45's. Both are connected to a TEC TC-721 Audio Selector which feeds the TechLink TPA-3 flat Pre-Amp. The HB noted a problem I was having with the TPA-3. The quiet passages' recording levels were at the -20 -50 dB and lower range which was in part the result of the TPA-3 having a fixed 28dB gain approx. The HB noted that -10 -20 dB range was desirable for quiet passages and recommended a pre-amp with tuner/aux input and variable gain (up to 30dB) follow the TPA-3 before it goes into the soundcard. The pre-amps with aux/tuner inputs I found on-line or at my local Vintage Record Shack ran $200 - $1,100 which is way outside my budget. However, I did find a TEC TC-780LC Stereo Line Level Booster with up to 20dB variable gain for about $55. The TPA-3 line-out goes into the TC-780LC line-in and the TC-780LC line-out goes into my ESI @Julia soundcard. I cab now adjust my recording levels within the ranges recommended in the HB. I found this very helpful in getting a good transcription.
                      I appreciate the knowledge and expertise Marc has shared in his HB. I think many newbies might find the HB helpful in getting off to a good start in recording/transcribing their records/tapes.
                      Last edited by RMBasso; 11-09-2018, 01:14 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the review - - - I will pass this on to Marc for his direct comments.

                        Craig
                        "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          RMBasso,

                          Thanks for the kind comments. The Handbook was a lot of work and its always gratifying to learn that I could help.

                          Marc

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X