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  • #16
    Originally posted by Craig Maier
    Selective filtering is a wonderful tool to understand and use for difficult audio restoration projects. It allows you to apply any filter or effect to a selected portion of a wavefile rather than the entire file.
    I'm by no means an expert with the program... probably more on the lines of an intermediate beginner, but that is one feature I use all of the time. Rarely do I apply filters for the entire duration of the file, but selectively as need be. It's a wonderful part of the product.

    GB

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    • #17
      Now I am confused.
      I got out my manual and looked up "Selective Filtering". It appears that the only filter that this is possible to use with is the filter sweeper.

      Can selective filtering like you suggested be used with other filters like the ezclean filter?

      If not, how am I supposed to get the same results using the filter sweeper filter?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Rick Barber
        Now I am confused.
        I got out my manual and looked up "Selective Filtering". It appears that the only filter that this is possible to use with is the filter sweeper.

        Can selective filtering like you suggested be used with other filters like the ezclean filter?

        If not, how am I supposed to get the same results using the filter sweeper filter?
        Hi Rick-

        The full explanation about the selective filtering process is explained on Pages 254 and 255 of the DC6 manual that even contains a helpful little tutorial (Selective filtering with Sync Mode).

        I don't know if my way is the best approach or not but this is how I employ Selective Filtering:

        I open up my file (in Classic Mode) in the source window as usual, then in the 'file' menu, once the source file is loaded, I select 'open destination' which will open up the dialog box of files to select. Select the same file as the source. Now you have the same file in the source and destination windows. Simply highlight the area you want to do the selective filtering on (in the source window). Employ any of the filters you want to use on the highlighted area. Once the filters are processed, this processed section will be inserted into the destination file. For all of this to work properly the 'Sync Files' selection has to checked in the "View" menu.

        I use this function a bunch because there always seems to be certain areas of my LP's that need more work than others and this is a way to avoid over processing parts of the file that do not need attention.

        I hope you can understand this; I know I'm not explaining it all that well... Just read up on it in the manual and play with it a bit. I think you'll love the feature...

        GB
        Last edited by Geebster; 12-06-2006, 03:58 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Geebster
          Hi Rick-

          The full explanation about the selective filtering process is explained on Pages 254 and 255 of the DC6 manual that even contains a helpful little tutorial (Selective filtering with Sync Mode).

          I don't know if my way is the best approach or not but this is how I employ Selective Filtering:

          I open up my file (in Classic Mode) in the source window as usual, then in the 'file' menu, once the source file is loaded, I select 'open destination' which will open up the dialog box of files to select. Select the same file as the source. Now you have the same file in the source and destination windows. Simply highlight the area you want to do the selective filtering on (in the source window). Employ any of the filters you want to use on the highlighted area. Once the filters are processed, this processed section will be inserted into the destination file. For all of this to work properly the 'Sync Files' selection has to checked in the "View" menu.

          I use this function a bunch because there always seems to be certain areas of my LP's that need more work than others and this is a way to avoid over processing parts of the file that do not need attention.

          I hope you can understand this; I know I'm not explaining it all that well... Just read up on it in the manual and play with it a bit. I think you'll love the feature...

          GB
          Bingo. That makes it much clearer. I will give that a try.

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          • #20
            The trick to remember with this technique is that it's always operating on the source and putting the result in the destination. So, for example, if you are simply upping the levels in certain spots, when you play back the destination folder, and you find it needs just a tad more, you need to go with the level increases you just did + a tiny bit, not redo it with the levels just a tiny bit higher than 0, or else you get a destination file with very little difference between source and destination.
            I sometimes get confused about that. Of course, I sometimes get confused when I try to drive and chew gum at the same time.

            Dan
            Last edited by Dan McDonald; 12-07-2006, 09:01 AM.
            Dan McDonald

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