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  • Audio to Digital converter

    I am very happy with my DC flat preamp, and with DCArt 10.62. I have been using a Behringer UCA 202 to convert the analogue output of my pre-amp to a digital signal that I can save and massage with DC10. However, I just realized that the Behringer unit uses 48kz converters, and I cannot find a unit to replace it that goes to 96kz and above. Should I spend time fussing with this or not? If so, can you recommend a substitute for the Behringer UCA 202?
    Larry Lapidus
    Spokane, Washington
    Last edited by Craig Maier; 07-31-2020, 07:45 PM.

  • #2
    That is murky waters. Some soundcards claim to support 96 kHz, yet in fact only emulate anything above 48 kHz. The only way that I know this is by measurements that I make using the spectrum analyzer in the software. But your question is along the lines of how do I know before making the purchase that the soundcard is actually sampling at 96 kHz and not emulating it. I got around it a long time ago by purchasing an Edirol Hard Disc recorder and then, measuring it. It is a model R-4 and produces a Nyquist (brick-wall) at around 47 kHz when set to 96 kHz. The Realtek chipset on this laptop records at 96 kHz, but the Spectrum Analyzer shows that it is only emulating the higher sample rate since it brick walls at 22 kHz. Maybe someone else has better information on this topic and will chime in.
    "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

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    • #3
      This is extremely interesting. It suggests that my efforts at dubbing LP's at 96/24 by setting setting those parameters in the DC10 recording module may produce essentially the same results as setting them at 48/16. Do you agree?

      Larry Lapidus

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      • #4
        Click image for larger version

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ID:	54714 If you set it for 96/24, it will indeed record at that rate and that bit depth. What you do not know is whether or not they are emulating the higher sample rate. Here is a pic of what the Realtek audio chip-set does on this laptop; it is indeed 96/24. It just adds an samples in - between samples taken at a lower rate. So, I do not have the true bandwidth advantage of the 96 kHz sample rate. It actually looks like it is sampling at 48 kHz and adding an extra sample of the same value in between sampling.
        Last edited by Craig Maier; 08-01-2020, 10:39 AM.
        "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

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        • #5
          Note the brick wall at around 22 kHz on the spectrum analyzer shown above (the vertical line), despite sampling at 96 kHz. My Edirol recorder when set to 96 kHz shows a brick wall at around 47 kHz, which is what one would expect.
          Last edited by Craig Maier; 08-01-2020, 07:52 PM.
          "Who put orange juice in my orange juice?" - - - William Claude Dukenfield

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